Recap: oven roasted malt porter-ish.

So I thought it would be good time to give you guys an update on the results of my roasted porter. I have to confess I haven’t done a great job of reviewing it while it was still existing. It had a short life span. Mostly due to a very successful wedding.

Since I can’t really write as I’m drinking it i’ll just do a all in one reflection.

Before mashing the grain had a very burnt scent to them comparing with commercial brown malt. The wet version was a bit sweeter, still a bit charcoaly tough. This carried through into the beer in some degree, it got a comment along the line: ”It’s has a very burnt flavor”. At first I was afraid it wouldn’t settle enough and be to overwhelming but it did in fact become very drinkable since it was so light in alcohol.

Sessionable yes, but it could have benefited from some more residual sweetness to balance the roastiness. I think it finished at 1.014 which isn’t that low but still not high for a beer whit a lot of roast character. So I would go a bit crazy with some light crystal if I’d do it again.

The color was light brown, similar to new castle, but did not match in flavor. It was packing more dark grain punch than what it looked like.

I probably won’t roast my own grains again, it’s not worth the time if you ask me. I have yet to master the commercially available malts. But for you brewers out there still interested in roasting your grains: go for it! My only advice would be, try to use them in smaller proportions.

My recipe was: 1.9 kg each of the two roast, 2 kg marris otter and 400 grams of caramunich I.
For hops I used just some First Goldings at 60, 10 and 5 minutes – around 25 IBUs.

Here’s some pics from the wedding party…

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